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coelasquid:

There are an alarming number of people who sincerely think pumpkin, as it grows out of the ground, naturally tastes like allspice, cinnamon, and ginger.

(via theoffbrandomni)

Source: coelasquid
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"Stop comparing where you’re at with where everyone else is. It doesn’t move you farther ahead, improve your situation, or help you find peace. It just feeds your shame, fuels your feelings of inadequacy, and ultimately, it keeps you stuck. The reality is that there is no one correct path in life. Everyone has their own unique journey. A path that’s right for someone else won’t necessarily be a path that’s right for you. And that’s okay. Your journey isn’t right or wrong, or good or bad. It’s just different. Your life isn’t meant to look like anyone else’s because you aren’t like anyone else. You’re a person all your own with a unique set of goals, obstacles, dreams, and needs. So stop comparing, and start living."

- Daniell Koepke  (via elauxe)

(via fuckyeahyoga)

Source: onlinecounsellingcollege
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kelpftw:

littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:

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"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.image

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All of these are so beautiful <3 

(via sailoranime)

Source: nofreedomlove
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huffingtonpost:

The Best Of Twitter’s #MuslimApologies

If you believe what what some (at best misinformed, at worst bigoted) people say, Muslims have a lot to answer for.

For more #MuslimApologies go here.

(via spectral-agony)

Source: huffingtonpost
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noctilucent-supercell:

So I’m working on my article for this week and I’m mad again.

Something always really bugged me about the defend Jora’s shrine event in Wayfarer Foothills. Unless a player pokes around a lot, it’s probably their major avenue of exposure to Jora’s story, and the best thing the Sons of Svanir have to do with their time is attempt to deface it. If they succeed, Ginna Stoneskaald says they’re doing it because Jora proved their dragon isn’t so strong, which, okay.

The preceding event’s objective is to defend the shrine, and there are two NPC allies in that one: Erika and Almarr. Both Ginna and Erika have great respect for Jora, because she’s way fukken cool. Almarr will tell you how much Erika loves Jora if you ask him! Why is he there? Oh, he thinks Jora’s statue is hot, haha.

Ha.

So I remembered that in the midst of writing about how real life gender dynamics functionally permeate pretty much the entire game and how that conflicts and contrasts with what is at this point essentially word of mouth lore about gender equality in Tyria. Almarr mentions offhand that Jora is considered a hero among the norn, but describes Erika as “obsessed” with her, because she can relate to Jora’s story. “Me, I just like looking at her statue. They don’t make women like that any more!”

Okay, so Almarr can’t relate to Great Norn Hero Jora, then? He just thinks she’s hot. And ferocious! Ooh, his favorite kind! We love a gal with a little fire in ‘er, the kind who will slay her own brother and help save her fucking people and look good doing it, hot dang!

It bothers me because this is exactly the same dynamic you can see constantly in real life conversations about women, real or fictional. If there are straight guys in the discussion and they’re not like, full consciousness-raised feminist allies, 80% of their total group contribution is going to be playing Hot or Not. The woman in question could have cured every infectious disease, but let’s talk about whether she’s bangable. This happens on the disproportionately large scale it does because of our ideas about women and their value as people.

Maybe it would have been different if Almarr’s comment about Jora’s looks had come at the end of a long spiel about her awesomeness, like the one Gemma offers. It certainly wouldn’t have come off as badly if he hadn’t used a negative term for Erika’s interest and then followed it up with a wink-nudge admission that he’s only there for the eye candy.

I’ve talked before about how weird it is that the Sons of Svanir (and the Flame Legion) adopted violent, pervasive misogyny in response to the actions of individual women, and how it actually lends a shitton of power to that mindset within the game world even though the he-man woman haters have red names and you get to beat them up. In Tyria sexism isn’t the result of thousands of years of oppression and reinforcement of gender norms; instead, it’s the natural conclusion you jump to when a woman derails your plans, complete with all of the “blerher woman weak gb2 kitchen” bullshit that accompanies real world assumptions of women’s competence and strength. Teleporting this crap whole hog into a setting where women can and do perform the exact same roles as men (and have done so, as far as we can tell, basically forever) as a punishment for the actions of individual women leads to two options: Either Jormag is literally the Elder Dragon of Misogyny and sexism is a corrupting magical power that can creep up out of thin air, or the norn and charr have always had a festering pit of disdain for women just waiting for an excuse.

Because in a really egalitarian society, this shit wouldn’t gain a foothold. The (comparatively) logical conclusion might have been to hate everyone in Jora’s bloodline or something, which made sense for Palawa Joko when he was pissed off at Turai Ossa. Who, you know, was a guy. So if a man fucks you over you carry the grudge to his entire family, but we have two cases where if a woman fucks you over you carry the grudge to half of the goddamn population.

Okay, there’s a third option: Real life issues tend to reproduce themselves in media if they go unexamined and even people who try hard not to do that can easily, you know, do that if a lot of effort isn’t put in to wrestling with it down to the very bone, where the question transforms from “How do we portray sexism as bad in this society?” to “Why would this society even be sexist?”

Because really if you want to portray the norn as an equal society the Sons would not exist. Events like this would not exist, where the goal is to stop a real shit-for-brains from becoming a Son of Svanir so you can hook him back up with the woman he completely fucking disrespected.  It doesn’t matter that these people are portrayed as villains; better words have been said about how reproducing tired prejudices in fictional characters doesn’t amount to a challenge of them, even if you say “that’s bad.”

If norn society weren’t already steeped in shitty ideas about women—and again, this is a society where women have been performing exactly the same roles as men for god knows how long—the first time some dumbass tried to form the MRA Fedora Club he would have been laughed out of the mead hall by everyone. There wouldn’t be worried conversations in Hoelbrak about how these ideas are spreading, there wouldn’t be any question of whether or not the Sons had a place there, unchallenged. They would have dragged the little shits to the middle of the city and let them stand up against a group of female warriors, to let them “prove” how weak women are, for the entertainment value. And then the proto-Sons probably would have gone up on the nearest mountain to sulk, all five of them. And hopefully been eaten by griffons.

RIP.

(via spectral-agony)

Source: ionized-airglow
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Finally!

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Someday, together…

(via indyexploits)

Source: hacott
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branna-laurelin:

The Ballad of the Goddess

One of my favourite tracks from my favourite Legend of Zelda game, Skyward Sword. The lyrics are in ancient Hylian, and this song is a mix of the orchestral version, the version Zelda sings, and the version you learn, which Fi sings. 

Arrangement, harp and vocals are all by me. 

Lyrics:

/en daʃeʋu nobe̞ ʃo̞ndʊ/
/tʏe ʃʊtʊ keuænu sale̞/
/en daʃeʋu nobe̞ dʊʃʊ/
/tʏe ʃʊtʊ nobe̞ dezu dotʃe̞/

(via elfofthewoodlandrealm)

Source: branna-laurelin
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